‘Concrete Rose’ by Angie Thomas

This review is long over due but I would be remiss not to say anything about it. I absolutely loved this book. Though it is the prequel to “The Hate U Give”, it stands on its own as its own.

We are back in Garden Heights but this time Thomas focuses on Maverick Carter who is 17-years-old and is at a crossroads in his life as he made to decide how he is going to make a living. Is it going to be following in his father’s footsteps and dabbling in the gang life where you can get “rich” quick, or is he going to get a “real” job, where the pay sucks but its an honest living. The decision becomes all the more difficult when he suddenly learns that he is a father and now has someone depending on him – his son Seven. Maverick’s decision becomes all the more difficult as he tries to do the right thing by his son but struggles to give him everything he needs.

Once again Thomas puts a difficult issue right on the table – gangs – and forces the reader to understand that sometimes, what you see on the news or hear in the public domain is all as it seems. That though society thinks people who are a part of the gang life choose this life, sometimes they feel like they have no other choice. It’s easy to form an opinion when you don’t actually live the life, and just like she did in “The Hate U Give”, she puts the reader right in front of it. And you begin to understand that sometimes it comes down to pure survival.

Maverick wants to leave the gang life. He saw what it did to his own family as his father is currently behind bars and his own mother struggles to pay the bills. What was a difficult life before is now even more difficult with the presence of a baby and all the costs associated with raising a child. Maverick is only 17, struggling to juggle school, work and raising his son. With his father as an example, Maverick knows that the gang life is not what he wants and vows to break the cycle so his son doesn’t follow. He gets a job that pays with a real paycheck, but as he barely makes ends meet, he wonders if doing a few odd jobs is so bad, at least until he gets enough money under his belt so they are more stable.

What also makes this book great is how Thomas tackles the subject of being a teenage parent from the male perspective. There are so many books about the teenage mom – the book that kept coming to mind while reading this book was “With the Fire on High” – but by focusing it on the teenage dad, Thomas also tackles themes of loyalty and duty. Maverick has a duty to take care of Seven and raise him right but often times that duty comes in conflict with the loyalty he feels toward the Kings. When one of their own is gunned down, Maverick’s loyalty is questioned as he struggles whether to retaliate.

Thomas said in an interview that she wrote this book because she had so many fans who wanted to know about Maverick’s life. While she could have presented his story in the present day of “The Hate U Give”, I am glad that she presented the story in the past because Maverick’s story deserved to be told on its own.

For those who have read “The Hate U Give”, you won’t be disappointed with the prequel.


Have you read this book? What did you think?

2 thoughts on “‘Concrete Rose’ by Angie Thomas

    • Thanks! I thought it was really well done. I also participated in the B&N author event where Thomas talks about the book. Everything was so thought out when we wrote this book, even down to researching the trends that would have been around during Maverick’s time (90s)

      Liked by 1 person

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