‘American Crisis: Leadership Lessons from the COVID-19 Pandemic’ by Andrew Cuomo

It’s hard to believe that it has already been a year since the coronavirus changed our way of life. For New York, the invisible threat was a little late, with our first case starting in March, but we were one of the first major outbreaks in the country. Yet, I can still remember it like yesterday.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo began his daily press conferences, updating New Yorkers on what was happening in the state, how many new cases there were each day, the number of deaths and how they were trying to handle it. For four months, I watched every single press conference along with our County Executive’s press conferences so I could provide updates to the members of the County Legislature, so they can be better informed for their local constituents.

Cuomo’s book “American Crisis: Leadership Lessons from the COVID-19 Pandemic” starts with inevitable early morning phone call on March 1, informing him that New York had its first confirmed cases of COVID-19 and then goes from there. In a diary sort of setup, each chapter is an important date, with the number of cases and death. He recaps the major points in the COVID-19 journey from the first cluster that hit Westchester, NY and caused the first “lockdown” to the shutdown of the entire state, what he ends up calling New York on PAUSE.

What makes this book interesting is the behind the scenes decisions that were being made as New York had to deal with each new crisis as it unfolded, even as Cuomo has to deal with his own family and staff that were being exposed or infected. Cuomo goes into detail about his negotiations with the federal government, particularly with President Trump and he doesn’t hold back on his derision for the decisions that were being made. He goes into the conflicts he had in making certain decisions and how at times he didn’t agree with any of the options laid out before him.

Cuomo has gotten some criticism for writing this book before the pandemic was officially over, but I think the intention of the book was not to take a victory lap but merely to describe how New York got over the first wave. Of course this book is a bit subjective as it is his personal account and there are a few times where he seems to be patting himself on the back, but honestly this book is merely a recap of what happened during those first few months.

Recently, there has been more and more news that has come out about those decisions, particularly about the nursing homes. Some of it he explains in the book, but it will be interesting how it plays out.

To be honest, I wasn’t a huge fan of Cuomo previously, but I think he did step up and lead during the crisis. I honestly believe he was doing the best he could given that this was an entirely new virus, and that goes for a lot of our officials – at least the ones that acknowledged that the virus was real and was trying to stop it. He was a calming voice who was trying to reassure people who didn’t understand what was going on. No one knew what they were doing. So were mistakes made? Most definitely. But that is what happens when local officials have to figure it out as they go along.

This is just one individual’s perspective and I am sure more and more books will be coming out about what has happened. Cuomo’s book is just a part of the narrative. Whether you choose to read it or not is completely up to you.

Book Club reading list (Part 1)

With the new year upon us, my book clubs are putting together their lists for the year of the books we are going to read. Two of them have completed their lists while another is halfway through and the fourth… well they go month to month so we never really know too far in advance. With so many books already on the TBR, I thought I would share what each book clubs is reading for 2021 in a multi-post series.

I am starting with the Modern Library Book Club, aka the classics book club, which I now run after the original organizers left. Originally this book club formed to read all the books on the Modern Library’s Top 100 Novels list but around the spring last year, we completed the list. Now we are reading the books that members of the book club thought should have made the list. So far all of the books we have read have been amazing. In fact, there hasn’t been a book yet that I haven’t DNR’d. And the list for 2021 has some really good ones, including some favorites. But enough of my gabbing. Here are the 12 books we are reading. (All book covers are linked to Goodreads).

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December


Are you a part of a book club? Have you read any of the books on this list? What did you think?

Tackling my personal TBR shelves in 2019

So earlier this year I posted a list of books that were on my personal shelves that I have yet to touch. At that time, I had about 50 books on the list, which I thought wasn’t too bad. Until I hit the spring library book sales at my local libraries and added to my shelves significantly. I think at the end, I added 40 new books.

img_0206

Since the spring, I have made a dent in reading the books that I added as well as some that have been waiting awhile. However, I never updated the list.

With the end of the year quickly approaching, I am revisiting that list I originally posted and seeing what I read and what I added but have yet to read still.

Strikethrough – I read

Blue – I added

Italics – I started but didn’t finish

Red – I took off my shelf/donated

The Classics

I love reading classics, but alas, I have so many on my shelf I never read. Many of them are from college or I picked up during a library book sale.

  1. Love in the Time of Cholera, Gabriel Garcia Marquezimg_0220
  2. Brave New World, Alduous Huxley
  3. A Room with a View, E.M. Forster
  4. In Cold Blood, Truman Capote
  5. Women in Love, D.H. Lawrence
  6. Nightwood, Djuna Barnes
  7. The Wind in the Willows, Kenneth Grahame
  8. Portrait of an Artist as a Young Man, James Joyce
  9. My Antonia, Willa Cather
  10. White Fang, Jack Limg_0219ondon
  11. The Call of the Wild, Jack London
  12. Moby Dick, Herman Melville
  13. To the Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf
  14. The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, James Weldon
  15. The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck
  16. Crime and Punishment, Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  17. Lord of the Flies, William Golding
  18. An American Tragedy, Theodore Dreiser
  19. The Three Musketeers, Alexandre Dumas
  20. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Robert Louis Stevenson
  21. The Age of Innocence, Edith Wharton
  22. The Modern Mephistopheles, Louisa May Alcott
  23. Under the Lilacs, Louisa May Alcott
  24. Sherlock Holmes Vol. 1 & 2, Arthur Conan Doyle
  25. The Sound and the Fury, William Faulkner
  26. A Light in August, William Faulkner
  27. The Jungle, Upton Sinclair
  28. Watership Down, Richard Adams
  29. Madame Bovary, Gustave Flaubert
  30. Mrs. Dalloway, Virginia Woolf
  31. The Good Earth, Pearl S. Buck
  32. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Betty Smith
  33. Treasure Island, Robert Louis Stevenson
  34. Rose in Bloom, Louisa May Alcott
  35. The Little Prince, Antoine De Saint-Exupery
  36. The Swiss Family Robinson, Johann David Wyss

Charles Dickens

I thought this one should have its own subject because .. well … it’s Dickens.

  1. Nicholas Nickleby
  2. David Copperfield
  3. A Tale of Two Cities
  4. Great Expectations

Nonfiction

Half of these have to do with journalism and I picked up in college to learn about some of the older writers. Many of the books I had started but never finished. Now that I understand the industry more, I might have a better appreciation for these.

  1. The Choice, Bob Woodwardimg_0221
  2. Angela’s Ashes, Frank McCourt
  3. Teacher Man, Frank McCourt
  4. My Paper Chase, Harold Evans
  5. The Gang that Wouldn’t Write Straight: Wolf , Thompson, Didion, Capote and the New Journalism Revolution, Marc Weingarten
  6. The New, New Journalism: Conversations with America’s Best Nonfiction Writers on their Craft, Robert S. Boynton
  7. It’s Not News, It’s Fark: How Mass Media Tries to Pass Off Crap as News,  Drew Curtis
  8. Night Draws Near: Iraq’s People in the Shadow of America’s War, Anthony Shadid
  9. Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic and Madness at the Fair that Changed America, Erik Larson
  10. Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavars, Mary Roach
  11. Seabiscuit, Laura Hillenbrand
  12. The Night Trilogy, Elie Wiesel (I only read the first one)
  13. Reading in Tehran, Azar Nefisi
  14. The Choice, Bob Woodward

Poetry

I don’t read a lot of poetry but I found one on my shelf.

  1. T.S. Eliot Selected Poems

Fiction

I am surprised that my fiction list isn’t longer but I think because I have stopped buying books and mainly go to the library. Also there were one or two of these that may belong on the classics list but wasn’t sure.

  1. Dragonfly in Amber, Diana Gabaldon
  2. Orphan Train, Christina Baker Kline
  3. Prodigal Summer, Barbara Kingsolverimg_0224
  4. The Lost Sisterhood, Anne Fortier
  5. Holes, Louis Sachar
  6. Shindler’s List, Thomas Keneally
  7. What Alice Forgot, Liane Moriarty
  8. After You, JoJo Moyes
  9. Chronicles of Narnia, C.S. Lewis
  10. House of Sand and Fog, Andre Dubus III
  11. Farewell My Lovely, Raymond Chandler
  12. Go Set a Watchman, Harper Lee
  13. The Golden Notebook, Doris Lessing
  14. Chronicles of the Insurrection, Julie Dickerson
  15. Release, Patrick Ness
  16. The Jungle Books, Rudyard Kipling
  17. Cuckoo’s Calling, Robert Gailbraith
  18. Murder on the Orient Express, Agatha Christie
  19. East of the Mountains, David Gusterson
  20. A River Runs Through It, Norman Maclean
  21. Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood, Rebecca Wells
  22. The Reader, Bernhard Schlink
  23. Son of a Witch, Gregory Maguire
  24. Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister, Gregory Maguire

Looking at the original list I read 4 and donated 1. However, I added 29 new books still to be read. Thus, my new total of books I have to read on my personal TBR is 75, up by 25. I seriously have some work to do. As in, reading what I have and not buying any more until I do (Yeah right!)

September TBR

Hey guys,

Can you believe it is already September? Sometimes I wonder where the time goes. I feel like we just started spring. Man oh man, gets me every time.

I am looking forward to this month because it’s already started with some surprises that were totally unexpected. I am not sure how they are going to pan out yet so I would rather hold off before saying anything.

In the mean time I am hoping to get back on schedule with everything else in my life. Monday is weigh in for the fall transformation challenge. I am not looking to lose anything but definitely tone up a bit. And definitely get back on my healthy food kick since this I really went off this summer.You can probably say I am kicking it off early since tomorrow is the inflatable 5k. I am so excited! It’s going to be so much fun!

Anyway, this month, I am taking it a little easier on the reading since I had such a long one last month. And yet there are six books on my list to start with, one of which I have already finished, and one I am halfway through with. I actually had to go and buy my book club reads for this  month and next month because the library didn’t have any copies or if they did, they were being borrowed, some of which were late. But I think the books are going to be good so I won’t mind. We will see. Ok enough of my blabbering. On to the list!

( All images from Goodreads)

Book Club Reads

KindredOld Wives TaleBeartown

Audiobooks

The Princess DiaristA Brief History of Time

Personal reads

Treasure Island


What are you reading this month? Have you read any on this list? What did you think? Share in the comments!

Goodreads 100 Books You Should Read in a Lifetime

Two years ago, this list was my reading list. I was looking for things to read and this popped up in my searches. I followed it ardently for several month. Then I found some book clubs and life got busy so the list kind of fell to the way side. I thought I would revisit it and see how much further I have to go.  I have marked the ones I have read, the TBRs and the one I own read and not read.

Strike through = read

Red color =haven’t read

Bold = own

  1. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  2. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  3. Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
  4. 1984 by George Orwell
  5. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling
  6. The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R Tolkien
  7. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  8. Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
  9. Little Women by Louisa May Aloctt
  10. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
  11. Fahrenheit 451: A Novel by Ray Bradbury
  12. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
  13. Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
  14. Animal Farm by George Orwell
  15.  The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
  16. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
  17. The Help by Kathryn Stockett
  18. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
  19. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
  20. The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
  21. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
  22. Lord of the Flies by William Golding
  23. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
  24. Night by Elie Wiesel
  25. Hamlet by William Shakespeare
  26. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
  27. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle
  28. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
  29. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
  30. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
  31. The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgeson Burnett
  32. Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
  33. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
  34. Brave New World by Alduous Huxley
  35. The Little Prince by Antoine Saint-Exupery
  36. Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
  37. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
  38. The Giver by Lois Lowry
  39. Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
  40. Macbeth by William Shakespeare
  41. The Adventures of Toms Sawyers by Mark Twain
  42. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
  43. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  44. The Holy Bible: New King James Version by Thomas Nelson
  45. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larrson
  46. The Counte of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
  47. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
  48. The Color Purple by Alice Walker
  49. East of Eden by John Steinbeck
  50. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
  51. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
  52. In Cold Blood by Truman Capote
  53. The Stand by Stephen King
  54. Alice’s Adventure in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll
  55. Watership Down by Richard Adams
  56. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
  57. Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
  58. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  59. Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
  60. Memoirs of a Geisha: A Novel by Arthur Golden
  61. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle
  62. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling
  63. The Old Man and the Sea by Earnest Hemingway
  64. Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin
  65. The Princess Bride: S. Morgenstern’s Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure by William Goldman
  66. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
  67. Life of Pi by Yann Martel
  68. The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
  69. Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
  70. The Scarlett Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  71. Dracula by Bram Stoker
  72. Harry Potter and and the Half Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling
  73. Catching Fire (The Hunger Games Books 2) by Suzanne Collisn
  74. Water for Elephants: A Novel by Sara Gruen
  75. The Raven by Edgar Allen Poe
  76. The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd
  77. Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
  78. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  79. The Poisonwood Bible: A Novel by Barbara Kingsolver
  80. The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
  81. The Time Travelers Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
  82. The Odyssey by Homer
  83. Celebrating Silence: Exerpts from Five Years of Weekly Knowledge 1995-2000 by Sri Sri Ravi Shankar
  84. A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
  85. And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
  86. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot
  87. The Thorn Birds by Colleen McCullough
  88. The Glass Castle: A Memoir by Jeannette Wells
  89. Mockingjay (The Final Book of the Hunger Games) by Suzanne Collins
  90. The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
  91. The Road by Cormac McCarthy
  92. Cutting for Stone by Abraham Vergehese
  93. The Brothers Karamazov by Fyoder Dostoevsky
  94. Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
  95. Beloved by Toni Morrison
  96. Helen Keller: The Story of My Life by Helen Keller
  97. The Phantom Tolbooth by Norton Juster
  98. From the Mixed up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E. L. Konigsburg
  99. Gone Girl by Gillian Flyn
  100. Crime and Punishment by Fyoder Dostoyevsky

Books read = 63

TBR = 37

Books I own= 49


How many of these have you read? Post in the comments below or make your own post and link it here. 🙂

Spring book sale #2

Hey all,

I went to my second library book sale for the season, and I think I may have gone overboard, though the haul’s people were leaving with, you wouldn’t know it.

The Schenectady Public Library’s annual book sale is the mother load of all book sales. When you first get there, you don’t even know where to start. There are rows upon rows of books that wrap around the building outside as well as fill a room inside. They even have a map posted on the wall to help you find a specific genre. But once you get your bearing, you hit the rows hard.

Having been to the one last year, I sort of knew the layout so I knew what sections to hit, though today, I skipped a few just to save time. It took me over an hour just to peruse the areas that I did and my bag filled up quickly. (I meant to take a picture of the rows but completely forgot my phone in my car, which was parked down the street.)

The other problem (well not a problem per se) is that paperbacks are 3 for $1, hardcovers are $1, children’s books are $25 for paperbacks and $50 for hardcover and newer books are $1. It’s so easy to just pile up the books. Yet, even though I easily filled my canvas bag with 20 books, I only spent $7. SCORE!

img_0206.jpg

I will say my haul is a little less organized than my last trip. I felt like I was in a race to find a book before everyone else. I mean, it was so packed, I not only had to park down the street, but there were sections you couldn’t even get through. I got there an hour into it and people were already filling up their trucks and going back in to get more. Ohhh, the books that I missed! I totally missed a Kurt Vonnegut book by a few seconds as I watched the guy next to me find it in a tray below the table and casually toss it into a mail carrier box he was toting around. I looked in longing for a second, made sure there weren’t any other hidden treasurers and walked on.

I am still happy with what I got. All the ones I have read were either nostalgia titles that I just wanted on my book shelf or just really good books that I have wanted for awhile. But I think this time around, I got more that I haven’t read. Which means my personal TBR list just got longer. (All titles are linked to Goodreads)

So for the classics, I got Our Town, The Crucible, Charlotte’s Web, The Jungle (TBR), The Swiss Family Robinson (TBR), The Sound and the Fury, The Giver, Watership Down (TBR).

In children’s books, I got what remained of the Harry Potter series (1, 2 and 4) because *GASP* I haven’t read the entire series. I actually have only gotten up to #4 but I need to reread before continuing. They were 25 cents each! How could I pass that up for Harry Potter? Anyways, I also got Walk Two Moons, which I recall reading growing up.

Other fiction picks were Son of a Witch, The Cuckoo’s Calling, Murder on the Orient Express, Christy and East of the Mountains, all of which are TBRs, and Where the Heart Is. The only nonfiction book is All The President’s Men, which I needed because it’s what finalized my path into journalism.

I think this may have been my biggest haul to date at a book sale. Now I need to rearrange my book shelves to fit them all. Though, maybe I will wait because I have one more book sale to scour before the season is over.

Yours truly,

Book Admirer


What books have you recently acquired? Have you read any in this pile? What did you think? Let’s discuss!

Amazon 100 Books to Read in a Lifetime Tag

So I first saw this tag on Thrice Read and then later on a few other blogs so today, I decided to finally do the Amazon’s top 100 books to read in a lifetime.

Amazon.com has a list of “100 Books to Read in a Lifetime” that’s been compiled by Amazon’s editors, and the question is, how many of Amazon’s recommended books have you read?

  1. Include the link to Amazon’s List
  2. Tag the creator of the meme (Thrice Read)

* Books I own but haven’t read yet.

Title Author Read?
1984 George Orwell Yes
A Brief History of Time Stephen Hawking
A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius Dave Eggers
A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier Ishmael Beah  Yes
The Bad Beginning Lemony Snicket
A Wrinkle in Time Madeleine L’Engle  Yes
Selected Stories, 1968-1994 Alice Munro
Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Lewis Carroll Yes
All the President’s Men Bob Woodward  Yes
Angela’s Ashes: A Memoir* Frank McCourt
Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret. Judy Blume
Bel Canto Ann Patchett
Beloved Toni Morrison  Yes
Born to Run Christopher McDougall
Breath, Eyes, Memory Edwidge Danticat
Catch-22 Joseph Heller  Yes
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Roald Dahl
Charlotte’s Web E. B White Yes
Cutting for Stone Abraham Verghese
Daring Greatly Brené Brown
Diary of a Wimpy Kid Jeff Kinney
Dune Frank Herbert
Fahrenheit 451 Ray Bradbury  Yes
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas Hunter S. Thompson
Gone Girl Gillian Flynn Yes
Goodnight Moon Margaret Wise Brow
Great Expectations* Charles Dickens
Guns, Germs, and Steel Jared Diamond Ph.D.
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone J.K. Rowling Yes
In Cold Blood* Truman Capote
Interpreter of Maladies Jhumpa Lahiri
Invisible Man Ralph Ellison
Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth Chris Ware
Kitchen Confidential Anthony Bourdain
Life After Life Kate Atkinson
Little House on the Prairie Laura Ingalls Wilder  Yes
Lolita Vladimir Nabokov
Love in the Time of Cholera* Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Love Medicine Louise Erdrich
Man’s Search for Meaning Viktor E. Frankl
Me Talk Pretty One Day David Sedaris
Middlesex Jeffrey Eugenides
Midnight’s Children Salman Rushdie
Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game Michael Lewis
Of Human Bondage W. Somerset Maugham
On the Road Jack Kerouac
Out of Africa Isak Dinesen
Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood Marjane Satrapi
Portnoy’s Complaint Philip Roth
Pride and Prejudice Jane Austen  Yes
Silent Spring Rachel Carson
Slaughterhouse-Five Kurt Vonnegut
Team of Rivals Doris Kearns Goodwin
The Age of Innocence Edith Wharton  Yes
The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay Michael Chabon
The Autobiography of Malcolm X Malcolm X
The Book Thief Markus Zusak  Yes
The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao Junot Díaz  Yes
The Catcher in the Rye J. D. Salinger  Yes
The Color of Water James McBride
The Corrections Jonathan Franzen
The Devil in the White City Erik Larson
The Diary of a Young Girl Anne Frank Yes
The Fault in Our Stars John Green Yes
The Giver Lois Lowry  Yes
The Golden Compass Philip Pullman  Yes
The Great Gatsby F. Scott Fitzgerald  Yes
The Handmaid’s Tale Margaret Atwood Yes
The House at Pooh Corner A. A. Milne  Yes
The Hunger Games Suzanne Collins Yes
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks Rebecca Skloot
The Liars’ Club Mary Karr
The Lightning Thief Rick Riordan
The Little Prince Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
The Long Goodbye Raymond Chandler
The Looming Tower: Al-Qaeda and the Road to 9/11 Lawrence Wright
The Lord of the Rings J.R.R. Tolkien  Yes
The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat Oliver Sacks
The Omnivore’s Dilemma Michael Pollan
The Phantom Tollbooth Norton Juster
The Poisonwood Bible Barbara Kingsolver  Yes
The Power Broker Robert A. Caro
The Right Stuff Tom Wolfe
The Road Cormac McCarthy  Yes
The Secret History Donna Tartt
The Shining Stephen King  Yes
The Stranger Albert Camus
The Sun Also Rises Ernest Hemingway  Yes
The Things They Carried Tim O’Brien  Yes
The Very Hungry Caterpillar Eric Carle
The Wind in the Willows Kenneth Grahame  Yes
The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle Haruki Murakami
The World According to Garp John Irving  Yes
The Year of Magical Thinking Joan Didion
Things Fall Apart Chinua Achebe
To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee Yes
Unbroken Laura Hillenbrand
Valley of the Dolls Jacqueline Susann
Where the Sidewalk Ends Shel Silverstein
Where the Wild Things Are Maurice Sendak

Wow 35 out of 100. Not too bad but definitely have some reading to do. A lot of these have been on my TBR so it shouldn’t be too difficult to cross some more off the list.

Tackling my personal TBR

Hey all,

So late last month, I posted the list of books on my personal TBR shelves (the books I have bought but never read). My goal is to put at least one TBR book on my monthly reading list in attempt to take control of it. For March, it was “Wind in the Willows” by Kenneth Grahame, which I successfully finish as of Friday morning along with a second, “What Alice Forgot,” by Liane Moriarty.

However, what I didn’t anticipate was adding more books to my list. A local library was having a book sale and well..need I say more? Paperbacks were 3 for $1 and hardcovers were $1! Luckily it was a small sale so I escaped with only four books, two of which I haven’t read.

Then in my Capital District Book Club, my name was picked at the end for a free book.

Release

So I have read two and added three. So not only am I now back to square one, I am plus one. And there are two more larger books sales coming up at the end of April and beginning of May. So this isn’t going to be as easy to conquer as I thought. :/

So here is my new updated list:

  • Strike through —I finished
  • Blue Italics — new books that were added

The Classics

I love reading classics but alas I have so many on my shelf I never read. Many of them are from college or I picked up during a library book sale.

  1. Love in the Time of Cholera, Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  2. Brave New World, Alduous Huxley
  3. A Room with a View, E.M. Forster
  4. In Cold Blood, Truman Capote
  5. Women in Love, D.H. Lawrence
  6. Nightwood, Djuna Barnes
  7. The Wind in the Willows, Kenneth Grahame
  8. Portrait of an Artist as a Young Man, James Joyce
  9. My Antonia, Willa Cather
  10. White Fang, Jack London
  11. The Call of the Wild, Jack London
  12. Moby Dick, Herman Melville
  13. To the Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf
  14. The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, James Weldon
  15. The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck
  16. Crime and Punishment, Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  17. Lord of the Flies, William Golding
  18. An American Tragedy, Theodore Dreiser
  19. The Three Musketeers, Alexandre Dumas
  20. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Robert Louis Stevenson
  21. The Age of Innocence, Edith Wharton
  22. The Modern Mephistopheles, Louisa May Alcott
  23. Under the Lilacs, Louisa May Alcott
  24. Sherlock Holmes Vol. 1 & 2, Arthur Conan Doyle
  25. Madame Bovary, Gustave Flaubert

Charles Dickens

I thought this one should have its own subject because .. well … it’s Dickens.

  1. Nicholas Nickleby
  2. David Copperfield
  3. A Tale of Two Cities
  4. Great Expectations

Nonfiction

Half of these have to do with journalism and I picked up in college to learn about some of the older writers. Many of the books I had started but never finished. Now that I understand the industry more, I might have a better appreciation for these.

  1. The Choice, Bob Woodward
  2. Angela’s Ashes, Frank McCourt
  3. Teacher Man, Frank McCourt
  4. My Paper Chase, Harold Evans
  5. The Gang that Wouldn’t Write Straight: Wolf , Thompson, Didion, Capote and the New Journalism Revolution, Marc Weingarten
  6. The New, New Journalism: Conversations with America’s Best Nonfiction Writers on their Craft, Robert S. Boynton
  7. It’s Not News, It’s Fark: How Mass Media Tries to Pass Off Crap as News,  Drew Curtis
  8. Night Draws Near: Iraq’s People in the Shadow of America’s War, Anthony Shadid

Poetry

I don’t read a lot of poetry but I found one on my shelf.

  1. T.S. Eliot Selected Poems

Fiction

I am surprised that my fiction list isn’t longer but I think because I have stopped buying books and mainly go to the library. Also there were one or two of these that may belong on the classics list but wasn’t sure.

  1. Dragonfly in Amber, Diana Gabaldon
  2. Orphan Train, Christina Baker Kline
  3. Prodigal Summer, Barbara Kingsolver
  4. The Lost Sisterhood, Anne Fortier
  5. Holes, Louis Sachar
  6. Shindler’s List, Thomas Keneally
  7. What Alice Forgot, Liane Moriarty
  8. After You, JoJo Moyes
  9. Chronicles of Narnia, C.S. Lewis
  10. House of Sand and Fog, Andre Dubus III
  11. Farewell My Lovely, Raymond Chandler
  12. Go Set a Watchman, Harper Lee
  13. The Golden Notebook, Doris Lessing
  14. Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood, Rebecca Wells
  15. Release, Patrick Ness

Have you read any of these? What books have you recently added to your personal TBR? Let’s discuss! Post in the comments below. 🙂

March Book Haul

We are 10 days into March and I think I finally have my reading list down for the month. It was a challenge to narrow down what I wanted to read, especially because my initial reading list for March was thrown a curve ball when I found all the books were either checked out with a wait list or they just didn’t have them.

So after some rearranging and actually caving into buying some books, the reading list is as follows:

img_0020

“The Magus” by John Fowles

This is my Modern Classic Book Club read for March and I am about three quarters through it. I will be honest, I went into this book with trepidation. After “The Ginger Man” and the fact that this book is 850 pages, I was hesitant to even start this one. But I am glad that I did. It is so good. Our book club meeting got pushed to this week due to the nor’easter on Wednesday but I am glad to have the extra week so I can take it all in.  A review should be coming on Thursday.

“The Woman in the Window” by A. J. Finn

This is an impromptu book club read. A group I am part of does a book club every so often and they decided to do one for March. I figured why not. However, because it is so new, the library was out of all their copies. I had to buy this one, hence the sticker still on the jacket. I hope it is worth the buy. The book club is also on Wednesday so I have a lot of reading to get done this week.

“Boy Erased: A Memoir of Identity Faith and Family” by Garrard Conley

My Capital District Book Club is reading is nonfiction for March and this is what the group picked. Another one that I had to buy. This will be my third nonfiction read for the month. Wow. The other two were good so I hope this one keeps the trend going. Stay tuned for a review next week.

“The Snow Child” by Eowyn Ivey

This is a leftover from February because I hate not reading books I selected. I renewed it and should be getting to it before the end of the month.

“The Wind in the Willows” by Kenneth Grahame

As promised, I am trying to narrow down my personal TBR list with a pick each month. Given my other serious reads, I figured this one might be an easy, fun read, especially since its a children’s book.

Other reads

Not pictured is the book I read at the start of the month, “The Underground Girls of Kabul: In Search of a Hidden Resistance in Afghanistan.” See my review here.

Also, I started my first audiobook. YAY! After some advice from friends and my followers, I went with an easy one to start. “Wonder” by R.J. Palacio. I’m on the last disc but I have already downloaded my next audiobook “A Wrinkle in Time” by Madeleine L’Engle. I should have reviews soon along with a post about my experience venturing into audiobooks. Stay tuned.

Yours truly,

Book Admirer


Have you read any books on this list? What did you think? Post your comments below. 🙂

 

My personal TBR shelf

Hey all,

This month’s library book haul is pretty nonexistent since most of the books I want to read are currently on loan. So, after being disappointed for a few minutes, I thought it was time to address my bookshelves and what seems like the TBRs that never get read.

Upon going through shelf by shelf and making a list, I have 50 books to be read so now is as good a time to address it. My plan is to pick at least one to read as part of my monthly reading list.

The Classics

I love reading classics but alas I have so many on my shelf I never read. Many of them are from college or I picked up during a library book sale.

  1. Love in the Time of Cholera, Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  2. Brave New World, Alduous Huxley
  3. A Room with a View, E.M. Forster
  4. In Cold Blood, Truman Capote
  5. Women in Love, D.H. Lawrence
  6. Nightwood, Djuna Barnes
  7. The Wind in the Willows, Kenneth Grahame
  8. Portrait of an Artist as a Young Man, James Joyce
  9. My Antonia, Willa Cather
  10. White Fang, Jack London
  11. The Call of the Wild, Jack London
  12. Moby Dick, Herman Melville
  13. To the Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf
  14. The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, James Weldon
  15. The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck
  16. Crime and Punishment, Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  17. Lord of the Flies, William Golding
  18. An American Tragedy, Theodore Dreiser
  19. The Three Musketeers, Alexandre Dumas
  20. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Robert Louis Stevenson
  21. The Age of Innocence, Edith Wharton
  22. The Modern Mephistopheles, Louisa May Alcott
  23. Under the Lilacs, Louisa May Alcott
  24. Sherlock Holmes Vol. 1 & 2, Arthur Conan Doyle

Charles Dickens

I thought this one should have its own subject because .. well … it’s Dickens.

  1. Nicholas Nickleby
  2. David Copperfield
  3. A Tale of Two Cities
  4. Great Expectations

Nonfiction

Half of these have to do with journalism and I picked up in college to learn about some of the older writers. Many of the books I had started but never finished. Now that I understand the industry more, I might have a better appreciation for these.

  1. The Choice, Bob Woodward
  2. Angela’s Ashes, Frank McCourt
  3. Teacher Man, Frank McCourt
  4. My Paper Chase, Harold Evans
  5. The Gang that Wouldn’t Write Straight: Wolf , Thompson, Didion, Capote and the New Journalism Revolution, Marc Weingarten
  6. The New, New Journalism: Conversations with America’s Best Nonfiction Writers on their Craft, Robert S. Boynton
  7. It’s Not News, It’s Fark: How Mass Media Tries to Pass Off Crap as News,  Drew Curtis
  8. Night Draws Near: Iraq’s People in the Shadow of America’s War, Anthony Shadid

Poetry

I don’t read a lot of poetry but I found one on my shelf.

  1. T.S. Eliot Selected Poems

Fiction

I am surprised that my fiction list isn’t longer but I think because I have stopped buying books and mainly go to the library. Also there were one or two of these that may belong on the classics list but wasn’t sure.

  1. Dragonfly in Amber, Diana Gabaldon
  2. Orphan Train, Christina Baker Kline
  3. Prodigal Summer, Barbara Kingsolver
  4. The Lost Sisterhood, Anne Fortier
  5. Holes, Louis Sachar
  6. Shindler’s List, Thomas Keneally
  7. What Alice Forgot, Liane Moriarty
  8. After You, JoJo Moyes
  9. Chronicles of Narnia, C.S. Lewis
  10. House of Sand and Fog, Andre Dubus III
  11. Farewell My Lovely, Raymond Chandler
  12. Go Set a Watchman, Harper Lee
  13. The Golden Notebook, Doris Lessing

You may say that 50 books are not so bad but mind you, these are ones I personally own. My TBR list on Goodreads is nearly triple this and grows every day. It’s time to address this issue!

Yours Truly,

Book Admirer


How many books on this list have you read? How many do you want to read? Post in the comments below. 🙂