TTT: Books that made me want to read more like it

It’s that time again for another Top 10 Tuesday from That Artsy Reader Girl. This week we are looking at the books that we have read that when we finished, we wanted to read something else just like it. I had to really think about this one, but I was surprised by how fast I could think of books that fit this description. That is, if I did it right.

Michelle Obama’s book was the first memoir from a former First Lady that I read and I enjoyed it so much that I became curious as to how many other First Ladies’ memoirs I could get my hand on. Their husbands are always the ones that everyone knows about and while each First Lady has that one thing that they are known for, we should know all the other things they have done. It’s my goal to start reading the memoirs of each First Lady along with their husbands in the future, though I am hoping that phrase will be switched to Madame President and First Man soon.

Speaking of Presidential memoirs, George W. Bush was the first President, whose activities I was conscience while growing up. His first term was while I was in high school and his second term finished while I was in college. So my interest in Presidential memoirs started with him. I was curious to read about his thoughts about 9/11 and the war on terror, considering that everyone else had an opinion. I needed to know what he was thinking at that time and what his rationale was behind some of the decisions that he made. And so a tradition was born that has led me to read Obama’s book, which was just as enjoyable. It remains to be seen if this tradition will skip the Trump era, but who knows. I may just get that curious.

I seriously had no plans to read “Circe” because in all honesty, I am just not that interested in Greek classic retellings. However, this became a book club read so I had no choice. And not only did I enjoy it, but I actually realized that I was being a little too harsh on the genre and I wanted to read some more. In fact, one just arrived in the mail, but that will be revealed in a later post.

This book is such a powerful book. It focuses on an hour in time during a school shooting and four characters who are in the school at the time of the incident. This book was so raw and literally pulls the reader into a scene that they hope they never are a part of. I seriously had to put the book down a few times because of my anxiety. However, when I got done reading it, I realized that I never heard of another fictional book like it, and done in such a way that it contributes to the conversation that needs to be at the forefront. I have since read another book, “Finding Jake” but I and my book club didn’t think it was that well done. In fact, I DNF’d it, particularly because it was one parent’s view from the outside, and while a parent’s thoughts and emotions are an important perspective, the one thing we all agreed about in book club was that the parent wasn’t believable. I have recommended this book to the group to see if they agree with my assessment. In the meantime, my search continues.

“Americanah” is the book that opened my eyes to the modern immigrant story and what they deal with when they come to America. I read it in 2016, right when immigration in the United States was flaring up to a whole new debate. This book helped me understand that the issue isn’t so black and white and helped me solidify where I stood in the debate. It has also led me to read many other great books including “Behold the Dreamers” which is one of my top 10 favorite books that I recommend every chance I get, as well as “American Dirt”, which focuses on immigration from South America to the US. Each book opens my eyes to the issue in a whole new way.

I would be remiss not to include “Little Women” on this list because this was the book that made appreciate the classics and go in search of more. It was the reason why I read “Jane Eyre” and “Pride and Prejudice” way before it was assigned in English class. It was the reason why I was the only one to read the summer reading assignment “To Kill a Mockingbird”. If not for this book, I think my reading of the classics would have ended once school was finished. Alas I am in a classics book club because I want to continue to expand my reading of the genre and talk about them.

This book about a single teenage mom trying to achieve her dreams and fighting to do is what people should focus on, but you just can’t forget about the food in this book. I seriously wanted to eat everything that was made. And after reading this book, I seriously wanted to read other books that incorporated food into the storyline. This book was just a pure comfort and I wanted to continue to feel that way.

So I finished this book only recently but it has seriously given me a whole new outlook on the fantasy genre. I read the genre sparingly but honestly, if I can find books that are similar to this one, I think I have my new obsession. This book made me not want to turn out the lights. This is a series I have to finish because I need to know what happens.

Seriously, when did young adult books start taking societal issues such as cop shootings against African Americans and put it into context that everyone could understand? I said it then, and I will say it again, everyone needs to read this book, because until you “experience” it, even if through the words of this book, you seriously can’t “understand” what they are going through. I thought I was passed reading young adult books but I’m learning more by reading them than by watching the news. Now find myself venturing over to the YA section of the book store to peruse the shelves.

“Brain on Fire” is a medical mystery about a woman who begins displaying random symptoms that have many people believing that she is a psychotic. Through the help of her family and, eventually doctors, learns she has a rare condition. Maybe it’s the fact that I suffer from an autoimmune condition that forced me to advocate for myself until the doctors would actually do something that this book resonated with me. Ever since, medical mystery stories have started to pile up on my TBR lists.


What books made you want to read more like it? Have you read any of the books on this list? Let’s discuss!

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