FFF: What book can you read a thousand times?

Fun Fact Friday is a weekly meme by Book Admirer with the purpose of getting to know fellow book bloggers. If you have an idea for a future FFF, please comment below!

We all have that one book that becomes our favorite. That one book that you continuously go to when there is nothing else to read or when you want something familiar.

Little WomenI hate to bore everyone but “Little Women” by Louisa May Alcott still holds that top spot. I used to read it at least once a year. I feel like I am so familiar with the characters that I am one of the March sisters. Growing up, I totally related to Jo, probably because I was a fellow writer, but also because of Jo’s spirit and independence. She didn’t follow the societal trend of her sister Meg and get married and have children. Well not right away. She went to go live by herself and explore her passion. Reading this growing up, I couldn’t wait to go do just that.

Meg was that loving, protective older sister that can be annoying in her fussiness but you know it’s just out of love. You know that you can go to her to talk to her when your mother is not around.

Beth. Ahh poor Beth. I have lost count on how many times I have read this book and Beth’s story always makes me cry. I just can’t get over it. Maybe because I relate so much to Jo and can feel her emotion in those pages.

Amy is that annoying, younger sister that is always traipsing along. Just GO AWAY! Yet my heart still pounds every time Amy falls through the ice. You can’t help but love her for her vanity and selfishness. I loved reading her story and how she matured into a young woman.

Laurie is the next door neighbor that you grow up with but nothing ever happens. When I first read this I was so rooting for Laurie and Jo’s relationship but in the end I am so glad that Alcott weaved a new route for the two of them. Besides, I am totally gaga over the professor. So much more Jo’s (my?) style. I guess I had a thing for older men but I seriously think the professor is Jo’s match intellectually. Laurie sometimes annoyed me in his frivolous adventures.

And of course you have the loving parents. Who wouldn’t want parents like Mr. and Mrs. March? They love their children but know when to be stern with them. Although Jo is closer to her father, I like her relationship with her mother and her mother helps Jo through her faults. As mothers do with their daughters. It always reminded me of my relationship with my mother.

Ok this is turning more into a review of the book than a simple answer so I will stop. But these are just some of the reasons why I always have Little Women close by.  I do also enjoy Jo’s Boys and Little Men, the second and third book, but Little Women will always be close to my heart.


What book can you read a thousand times? Why? Let’s discuss! Post in the comments

4 thoughts on “FFF: What book can you read a thousand times?

  1. I’ve read LW three times – once as a child and twice for a course on children’s lit. The character of Jo had stayed with me from that first experience – loved the tomboy nature. But as an adult I find it too didactic…..

    Like

  2. I absolutely love this book, definitely one of my favourites.
    Bhaer & Jo were way more compatible than Jo & Laurie were and Laurie & Amy too. Both pairs resolved their conflicts in a much more healthy manner than Jo & Laurie ever did. As much as I relate to Jo, I don’t believe Amy gets near enough credit for how tenacious, pragmatic, understanding and fun she is. And all her “negative” traits are very realistic & normal for teens who aren’t always bookworms. Little Women is so amazing, there’s always something new to be learnt from rereading it.

    Liked by 1 person

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